IEEE GRSS Data Fusion Contest: Open data for global multimodal land use classification

2017 IEEE GRSS Data Fusion Contest: Open data for global multimodal land use classification

The 2017 edition of the IEEE GRSS Data Fusion Contest is open!

Don’t miss the opportunity to get multimodal remote sensing and VGI data, to present and publish your work with these data at IGARSS 2017, to be awarded an IEEE Certificate of Recognition and to win an NVIDIA GPU card!

Learn more below and on the Contest website:
http://www.grss-ieee.org/community/technical-committees/data-fusion/data-fusion-contest/

The Contest: Goals and Organization

The 2017 IEEE GRSS Data Fusion Contest, organized by the Image Analysis and Data Fusion Technical Committee, aims at promoting progress on fusion and analysis methodologies for multisource remote sensing data.
The 2017 Data Fusion Contest will consist in a classification benchmark. The task to perform is classification of land use (more precisely, Local Climate Zones, LCZ, Stewart and Oke, 2012) in various urban environments. Several cities have been selected to test the ability of LCZ prediction at generalizing all over the world. Input data are multi-temporalmulti-source and multi-modal (image and semantic layers).

Local climate zones are a generic, climate-based typology of urban and natural landscapes, which delivers information on basic physical properties of an area that can be used by land use planners or climate modelers [Bechtel et al., 2015]. LCZ are used as first order discretization of urban areas by the World Urban Database and Access Portal Tools initiative (WUDAPT, http://www.wudapt.org), which aims to collect, store and disseminate data on the form and function of cities around the world.

The LCZ classes in this study correspond to those of [Stewart & Oke, 2012]:

10 urban LCZs corresponding to various built types:

  1. Compact high-rise (class code in the ground truth: 1);
  2. Compact midrise (class code in the ground truth: 2);
  3. Compact low-rise (class code in the ground truth: 3);
  4. Open high-rise (class code in the ground truth: 4);
  5. Open midrise (class code in the ground truth: 5);
  6. Open low-rise (class code in the ground truth: 6);
  7. Lightweight low-rise (class code in the ground truth: 7);
  8. Large low-rise (class code in the ground truth: 8);
  9. Sparsely built (class code in the ground truth: 9);
  10. Heavy industry (class code in the ground truth: 10).

7 rural LCZs corresponding to various land cover types:

  1. Dense trees (class code in the ground truth: 11);
  2. Scattered trees (class code in the ground truth: 12);
  3. Bush and scrub (class code in the ground truth: 13);
  4. Low plants (class code in the ground truth: 14);
  5. Bare rock or paved (class code in the ground truth: 15);
  6. Bare soil or sand (class code in the ground truth: 16);
  7. Water (class code in the ground truth: 17).

An example for the city of Bologna (Italy) can be seen below:

The contest aims to promote innovation in classification algorithms, as well as to provide objective and fair comparisons among methods. Ranking is based on quantitative accuracy parameters computed with respect to undisclosed test samples from cities unseen during training. Participants will be given a limited time to submit their classification maps after the competition is started. The contest will consist of two steps:

Step 1 – training: Participants are provided with five training cities (Berlin, Rome, Paris, Sao Paulo, Hong Kong), including ground truth to train their algorithms.

Step 2 – testing on new cities: Participants will receive the data of the test cities and will submit their classification maps by three weeks from the release of this second part of the data set. In parallel, they will submit a short description of the approach used. After evaluation of the results, 4 winners will be announced.

Calendar:

January 9th – Contest opening: release of training cities (step 1)
March 13th – Release of test cities (step 2): evaluation server is open
April 1st – Submission of classification maps deadline: the submission server is closed
April 5th – Winners announcement

References:
[Stewart & Oke, 2012] I.D. Stewart and T.R. Oke, Local climate zones for urban temperature studies, Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, 93(12):1879-1900, December 2012.
[Bechtel et al., 2015] B. Bechtel et al., “Mapping Local Climate Zones for a Worldwide Database of the Form and Function of Cities,” ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information, vol. 4, no. 1, pp. 199–219, Feb. 2015.

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